Beauty is in the (fish)eye of the beholder

As I said in another post, I am trying to travel as light as possible, and this includes my camera. I got a micro 4:3 mirror-less that I am quite happy with, especially after getting around for days with a fraction of the weight and a ‘normal’ (ie. non-camera) backpack.

However I have always had a soft spot for fisheye lenses, so when I saw the Samyang micro 4:3 7.5 mm I knew I had to buy it. It is quite cheap for a lens, so I wasn’t expecting much, despite reading good reviews, but I was wrong!

When I first opened the package I could not believe how tiny it is. But it’s also really well built, metal thread, and mostly metal construction; the aperture and focus ring are smooth to operate. Yes, it’s a manual lens, it’s actually my first all manual lens. I was a bit wary, but it’s actually really easy to operate: I usually set the camera to aperture priority, then I operate the lens. With the great depth of field of a lens so short it’s easy to have everything in focus, but if I really am not sure, I can always use the on-screen magnifier. No EXIF data, of course.

This is a full frame fisheye and it’s also surprisingly usable. It warps subjects only when you place them on the borders, which is something I found disappointing at the beginning, but I have come to appreciate.

Would you think this was taken with a fisheye? I didn’t correct anything.

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As you can see there are no flares, even with sun in the frame. I am impressed.

Here are some more shots, where you can appreciate the lens’s fisheyeishness 🙂

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Girl Bitten By A Lizard

I have always thought that the famous painting by Caravaggio – Boy Bitten By A Lizard – was a bit over the top. I mean, a green lizard (the Italian title specifies “green lizard”) Biting? Do green lizards even bite?
Then the other day one of my cats caught a green lizard and I had an epiphany.

I saw he was looking intently at something in the garden, so I went out, saw the poor lizard and took the cat inside. Then I went out again to check on the silly reptile: I saw it was wounded and was not moving, so I wanted to have a closer look and I caught it. It bit me.
Green lizards do bite. It didn’t really hurt, but I was taken aback. And I thought of the many times I scoffed at the painting’s title

http://www.friendsofart.net/en/art/caravaggio/boy-bitten-by-a-lizard

Lisboa

Last week-end I went to Lisbon.
I hadn’t been back for a while and it was really nice to see the city again. I hadn’t realised I had missed it so much.

I have visited many cities by the sea, but none of them has such an intense relation with water, the sea, the river. So much of its folklore, traditions, art is intimately related to water. It is a town that is open and welcoming towards its river, the Tejo: if you go to the grand Praça do Comercio, the entrance to Lisbon from the river, you see a huge square, one side of which is the river itself, and even if it’s huge you do not feel intimidated or dwarfed, you see an embrace.

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I like the light in Lisbon’s old town: the streets are cobbled with white stones that reflect the clear light and the atmosphere is really special. Sometimes they are paired with black stones to form patterns and designs, and the result is always very pleasing. (Black and white are Lisbon’s colours)

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Lisbon is also the city of hills, steep hills. It’s a bit like San Francisco, even if the impression is completely different, as the streets are very narrow, sometimes to the point that there is no car transit, the houses are made of stone, and usually there are drying clothes hanging from the balconies.

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